Living In Spain v elsewhere/was Pozo negro

Do you have a query on how to get things done in Andalucia, where to find things, who to call? Find out by posting and hear about others experiences.
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silver
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Postby silver » Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:26 pm

Id have to keep active by digging out septic tanks and installing solar panels etc on my country shack.

What is so bad about that...sound ok to me..most that I know really enjoy this..watching others being active..eg football or cricket and drinking beer..isnt everyones cup of tea.
At present job opportunities here are few and far between in Andalucia...but can be found in Madrid and Barcelona and other large towns.
No muerdes la mano que te da de comer.

frank
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Postby frank » Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:37 pm

Lorraine - Mijas wrote: The roads between Marbella and Estepona are often hellish and equal to anything I had to encounter in the UK.
Lorriane


We used to visit Benahavis, near San Pedro, up until about 4/5 years ago, and can certainly confirm what you say. We gave up on the place! Apart from the fact the village became totally spoilt by all the building, as soon as you went down to the coast, invariably it was gridlock. San Pedro itself became absolutely impossibe (and impassable!)
Regards, Frank

No soy residente, simplemente un turista, ¿qué sé yo?

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Postby frank » Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:43 pm

silver wrote:
At present job opportunities here are few and far between in Andalucia...but can be found in Madrid and Barcelona and other large towns.


Sure there are more jobs there, unfortunately more people chasing them. Met three Spanish from Barcelona, here in UK recently, all professional people, and they are all working here because they cannot get work in Spain.. And at a wage they could not dream of in Spain.
Regards, Frank

No soy residente, simplemente un turista, ¿qué sé yo?

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silver
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Postby silver » Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:50 pm

professional people,
If you mean doctors, biologists ect.. the ones I know earn far more than you would ever imagine...If you have ever had an apointment with someone like this..and you can count it wont take you too long to work out just how much some profesionals do earn here..
but only the best get jobs straight out of university..the others get their experience elsewhere then come back and open a consulta of their own and earn a bomb.
No muerdes la mano que te da de comer.

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kevin77
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Postby kevin77 » Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:51 pm

At present job opportunities here are few and far between in Andalucia...but can be found in Madrid and Barcelona and other large towns.


True, but the last time I worked in Madrid you had to have a very good level of castellano. Its the capital you see and English is not the dominant language for some reason! Also a bit of catalan would help you in Barcelona. That rules out most of the 'new lifers' who arrive in Malaga every day looking for their promised land.

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silver
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Postby silver » Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:58 pm

last time I worked in Madrid
You don´t alf get around kevin...

'new lifers' who arrive in Malaga every day looking for their promised land.
Who made all these ******promises then??????????
No muerdes la mano que te da de comer.

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Postby kevin77 » Mon Sep 19, 2005 4:09 pm

You don´t alf get around kevin...


I havent spent my life stuck in a remote Andalucian village, no.

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hillybilly
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Re: Living In Spain v elsewhere/was Pozo negro

Postby hillybilly » Mon Sep 19, 2005 4:21 pm

Bongtrees wrote:Living on a track in an uninsulated house with a woodburner or worst still a portable gas heater, well water, no electricity etc etc are manageable when someone is fit and healthy but I would not like to think how difficult that or those persons lives could deteriote if they or a partner becomes infirm.


This type of problem is not one peculiar to a remote finca in Spain. I used to work for a housing charity in Bristol enabling the elderly and disabled to remain in their own homes (if they wanted) by carrying out adaptations, repairs etc etc.
Even in a city centre Victorian 2 up 2 down terrace house the elderly and infirm sometimes had the most awful difficulties in coping. Often isolated, afraid to open their front door, unable to use the stairs, sometimes living in conditions that beggared belief eg having to use a bucket for a toilet, no heating, unsafe wiring, living on tea and sandwiches because they had no cooking facilities, mould growing on the walls, buckets catching the rainwater in the bedroom.....we encountered some people who hadn't been outside of their own 4 walls for months. This was Bristol, UK, 21st century.
Nobody can predict what will happen to us as we get older but given the choice I think I'd rather age disgracefully in the sun!

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silver
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Postby silver » Mon Sep 19, 2005 4:43 pm

I havent spent my life stuck in a remote Andalucian village

Like Cervantes..and most other things in life, you have to TRY to enable judgment.. only fools make comments about things they know nothing of.
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Postby kevin77 » Mon Sep 19, 2005 4:54 pm

Like Cervantes..and most other things in life, you have to TRY to enable judgment.. only fools make comments about things they know nothing of.

What? so I have to sell up and move to a rundown shack in the mountains with no water, gas, electricity, sewerage so that I can make comments.
I think that would make me a fool.
Like I said at the beginning of this thread, some of the stories about Andalucia remind me of my old fellas comments about rural Ireland when he was a kid - and he wouldnt go back to that.
Some people are stuck with it though!

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Postby frank » Mon Sep 19, 2005 5:09 pm

silver wrote:
professional people,
If you mean doctors, biologists ect.. the ones I know earn far more than you would ever imagine....


These particular three were a vet, a translator, and a chemical engineer. It's a fact, Spain is turning out more doctors, nurses, vets etc than it has posts for. As a consequence, there are now many of these working in UK. In our area, we regularly have Spanish vets, and talking to them, it seems they have worked all over UK. As Spain's unemployement rate is over twice that of the UK, I guess it's not surprising. As regards doctors or specialist charges in Spain, I know nothing, but I know a cosy five min chat with a specialist here will set you back somewhere in the region of £140.
Regards, Frank

No soy residente, simplemente un turista, ¿qué sé yo?

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silver
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Postby silver » Mon Sep 19, 2005 5:34 pm

kevin77 A sentence can change its meaning if you don't read all of the words.
some of the stories about
England remind me of horror movies...but I´m sure its not that bad there now days.
summing up the forums posts over the last year regarding both lands....it is fare to say..England is great for working and Spain for living.
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Postby katy » Mon Sep 19, 2005 5:52 pm

Frank - Benhavis, we ate there a few weeks ago and hadn't been for about a year, its horrific, if you haven't visited for 4 years you should see it now (or perhaps not). We once contemplated buying a house there thank god we didn't. Spent a lot of my childhood in S Pedro but don't go there now.

As for cesspits, couldn't think of anything worse than having one in my garden. Tried the cortijo thing years ago and its ok for summer hols but when we moved out for good soon changed my mind. Electric fading, cold in winter is different to the cold in the UK and we went through the gas cylinder route, its just great when you run a hot bath and it goes! Well ran dry during the last drought. This was not a ruin it was a "reformed house" with two bathrooms. Inspite of central heating our clothes always felt damp in the wardrobes during the rainy times. Our only neighbours were campo workers and a few toothless widows, great meaningful conversations!!

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silver
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Postby silver » Mon Sep 19, 2005 6:09 pm

Benhavis...horrific...It was lovely before the Brits arrived...now can compare to Blackpool..no ..not quite.
Tried the cortijo thing years ago and its ok for summer hols
sound to me the problem was with the "cortijo" This was not a ruin it was a "reformed house" with two bathrooms.
horrific
(cortijo s have afew more than 2 bedrooms) Who reformed it???
Electric fading, cold in winter is different to the cold in the UK and we went through the gas cylinder route, its just great when you run a hot bath and it goes! Well ran dry during the last drought. This was not a ruin it was a "reformed house" with two bathrooms. Inspite of central heating our clothes always felt damp in the wardrobes during the rainy times. !
sounds like a cowboy job...but nothing that money cant change.
Our only neighbours were campo workers and a few toothless widows, great meaningful conversations!!
Who is your neighbour now????and just how much meaningful conversations are you involved in???
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frank
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Postby frank » Mon Sep 19, 2005 7:57 pm

katy wrote:Frank - Benhavis, we ate there a few weeks ago and hadn't been for about a year, its horrific, if you haven't visited for 4 years you should see it now (or perhaps not). We once contemplated buying a house there thank god we didn't. Spent a lot of my childhood in S Pedro but don't go there now.



I think it was last year, or possibly the year before, we popped in on our way down from Ronda to see a friend, and like you, I was horrified! :( What was a nice spot by the river, has now got a huge new hotel, on the hillside on the left as you drive in, which had no buildings at all there, is covered with houses, La Pacheca on the right has had new blocks built right in front of it blocking out all the riew to the river. Another place I won't be revisiting. Shame, I liked it 15 years ago! I realise we can't stand still, but Benahavis for me, has been completely ruined.
Regards, Frank

No soy residente, simplemente un turista, ¿qué sé yo?

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Postby jpinks » Mon Sep 19, 2005 8:31 pm

Absolutely - Benahavis is a good example of bad-taste development ruining a nice spot. Unfortunatley all too common when you look around other places in Spain and other countries. I was horrified to hear that Goa beaches are now all built up with hotels - for example. There was nothing there when I was living in India in the 1980's. One of the many reasons for moving to the deep campo in Spain was to avoid similar "developments" as we had been inflicted with quite a few monstrosities in Scotland before we left.
This is not a specifically Spanish phenomena.
Slainte,
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poshtotti
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Postby poshtotti » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:07 pm

I love my life in Andalucia!

After visiting many countries, this is where I decided to move to, full time. However, I was head hunted & offered a great position back in England, thinking how great it would be to be earning a great salary again........We left last year & went back to live in our house in the UK, after selling my car, shipping his back, locking the doors to our home in Spain, the new job was ok, but long hours & stress turned into arguments. It took 9 weeks before we were back living in Andalucia! - Why? - Because it rained everyday in the UK, there were people everywhere, even the most secluded pubs near our house were packed with non locals & had lost their ambiance. The food didn't taste as good, we spent most of our time in the car in a jam, inside watching the box & feeling pretty miserable, the weather got to us, the road rage came back & we soon realised why we had left in the first place.

Since we got back "home" to Spain, we rarely switch the tv on, have conversations again, eat out on a regular basis, buy the most fantastic, fresh fruit & vegetables from the market, sit on the terrace 'til late evening, socialise more so with an outside life, even during the week!!!
If we get cold in winter we have a log fire, put on a jumper & chunky socks, big deal....did the same in the UK. We have power cuts occasionally, but living in the countryside in the UK we did too.

Our friends love coming to stay with us, they get a cheap holiday, we see more of them now than we did occasional weekends in the UK.

The only thing I would change is down to me & me only & that's becoming fluent in Spanish, I've started lessons & I get by, it's made a real difference to quality of life being able to converse with Spanish people & I feel there is more of a mutual respect, I've decided to live in another country so it's up to me to make the effort. I've just negotiated Spanish lessons for free with a neighbour, in return for me helping her with her English, because she feels her business will not survive with Spanish custom alone - How sad! :(

It got to me today when my car wouldn't start & I popped into an English bar (with a packed car park) to see if anyone could possibly give me a jump start, no one would leave their pint for 2 minutes. A Spanish gentleman parking his car, saw I was having problems & very kindly helped me out. It cost him less than 2 minutes of his time & made someone appreciate him.

katy
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Postby katy » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:28 pm

Silver your beloved spanish builders reformed our cortijo but you always try to have an answer for everything, our architect came down from madrid and personally employed the workers. As for sitting out the winter in jumpers and sox -- yeah great, just what I came to andalucia for!!

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Postby Lorraine - Mijas » Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:55 pm

Never mind Katy, if you don't like jumpers and sox, you could always live at Rincon, they get to wear snorkel and flippers as well in winter!!

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Postby frank » Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:50 pm

katy wrote: As for sitting out the winter in jumpers and sox -- yeah great, just what I came to andalucia for!!


This is getting scary, that's a few times I have agreed with you now Katy! :D Dressing up to keep warm, and huddling around a solitary gas heater is not what it should be about, in my opinion. I would only move to Spain for a much better quality of life, and sitting in a damp, freezing house through the winter does not seem a step in the right direction.
Regards, Frank

No soy residente, simplemente un turista, ¿qué sé yo?


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