Costa de la Luz

Costa de la Luz

Hostals and hostels are a fantastic way to travel Andalucia on a budget. Despite their affordable prices, this doesn't mean to say that you have to compromise on quality, with many well known for their individual character and centralised location.

If you want unspoilt, wild beaches, the Costa de la Luz is for you. From the Coto Doñana Park with its wild boar, lynx and rare birds, to trendy wind and kite-surfing spot Tarifa, this coast, which stretches between the Portuguese border in the west to Tarifa in the east, is a haven of tranquility.

The Gran Teatro (Great Theatre) was built by Pedro Sánchez y Núñez in 1923.It is a stately building of classic style, typical to the late nineteenth century with Second Empire decoration.

Islantilla is the small neighbouring resort to La Antilla with a wide, sandy beach and some excellent seafood restaurants. It has about 1200 inhabitants.

Cartaya is a small town located a few km inland fromt he coast on and close to the Rio Piedras. The centre of the old town has a beautiful historical and artistic heritage. Cartaya is set in a natural rural environment with beaches, pine forests and marshland.  El Rompido is the pretty costal village and local holiday resort on the coast within the municipal district.  Cartaya has about 19, 100 inhabitants.

Seven kilometres from Punta Umbría is the small resort of El Portil, with its 13-hectare reserve of a small freshwater lagoon, the Reserva Natural Laguna de El Portil. The reserve is most well known for its population of chameleons.

It is situated west of Huelva, around the minor resort and fishing village of El Rompido. The Piedras river has formed an estuary surrounded by marshlands. Where the river meets the Atlantic Ocean a long sandy spit has formed, called the Barra or Flecha del Rompido.

The Paraje Natural de las Marismas del Odiel is the second most significant wetland reserve in Andalucía after the Parque Nacional de Doñana. This large estuary and marshland of the Odiel and Tinto rivers covers 72-sq-km between Huelva City, Punta Umbría, Gibraleón and Aljaraque. It was granted protected status in 1989. The best time to visit is in spring during the breeding season and in winter when there are lots of waterfowl.

Just outside of Punta Umbría is an area covering 162 hectares of protected beach, sand dunes and woods, including a juniper grove, one of the few examples of this type in Andalucía. The 50-m wide beach, with fine, golden sand, stretches for 2.3km.