Cordoba City - Home

Cordoba has so much to offer the visitor.
Cordoba has so much to offer the visitor.

Cordoba CITY

 

Cordoba was founded by the Romans and due to its strategic importance as the highest navigable point of the Guadalquivir River, it became a port city of great importance, used for shipping Spanish olive oil, wine and wheat back to Ancient Rome. The Romans built the mighty bridge crossing the river, now called "El Puente Romano". But Cordoba's hour of greatest glory was when it became the capital of the Moorish kingdom of El-Andalus, and this was when work began on the Great Mosque, or "Mezquita", which – after several centuries of additions and enlargements – became one of the largest in all of Islam.

When the city was reconquered by the Christians in 1236, the new rulers of the city were so awed by its beauty that they left it standing, building their cathedral in the midst of its rows of arches and columns, and creating the extraordinary church-mosque we see today.

Hotels

Hotels & Accommodation in Cordoba. More >

Hostals & Hostels

Hostals & Hostels in Cordoba More >

Apartment Rentals

Self-catering apartment rentals in Cordoba More >

Restaurants

Restaurants & Tapas in Cordoba More >

Things to see

Things to see in Cordoba More >

Things to do

Things to do in Cordoba More >

Mosque / Cathedral

On of the key Monument in Andalucia More >

Patios Festival

Patios festival takes place each May More >

Guided tours

Guided tours in Cordoba More >

Getting there

Getting there - Cordoba  More >

Getting around

Getting around Cordoba More >

Buses & Timetables

Cordoba Buses & Timetables More >

Museums

Museums in Cordoba. More >

More about

Mor about Cordoba More >

As well as the unique mosque-cathedral, Cordoba's treasures include the Alcazar, or Fortress, built by the Christians in 1328; the Calahorra Fort, originally built by the Arabs, which guards the Roman Bridge, on the far side of the river from the Mezquita, and the ancient Jewish Synagogue, now a museum. Cordoba's medieval quarter, once the home of the Jewish community, is called "La Judería" (The Jewry), a labyrinth of winding, narrow streets, shady flower-filled courtyards and picturesque squares such as La Plaza del Potro. In early May, homeowners proudly festoon their patios with flowers to compete for the city's "most beautiful courtyard" contest.

 

The patios of Cordoba are just breathtaking. © Michelle Chaplow
The patios of Cordoba are just breathtaking.

Hover the cursor over Cordoba to see bigger map and click to go to the maps page.