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Cathedrals

Cathedrals

Cordoba´s Mezquita, once the largest mosque in the world, is the most well-known and outstanding monument in Cordoba. In order to truly experience the mezquita and its surroundings, we think that the best thing to do is to stay in a hotel nearby, possibly with spectacular views of this terrific building.

Malaga´s cathedral was built between 1528 and 1782 on or near the site of a former mosque. While original plans had allowed for two towers, both lack of funds those donated to American Independence resulted in the completion of only one, giving rise to the name by which the cathedral is affectionately referred to, La Manquita, loosely interpreted as "one armed woman".

The Mezquita (Mosque) dates back to the 10th century when Córdoba reached its zenith under a new emir, Abd ar-Rahman III who was one of the great rulers of Islamic history. At this time Córdoba was the largest, most prosperous cities of Europe, outshining Byzantium and Baghdad in science, culture and the arts. The development of the Great Mosque paralleled these new heights of splendour.

A grandiose structure capped by a dome of golden tiles was described by Richard Ford as "a stranded wreck on a quicksand." This 18th Century Baroque cathedral gets few visitors. An impressive collection of church treasures can be viewed and in the crypt lies the tomb of composer Manuel de Falla, a Cadiz native, whose music is evocative of the magic of Andalucia.

This fortified behemoth of a basilica was designed in the 16th century with a dual role: as a place of worship, but also to protect the citizens when pirates attacked the city of Almeria after the Reconquest. Built in 1524, after an earthquake destroyed the previous structure, the cathedral is constructed, like so many churches in Spain, on the site of a mosque.