Header Banner - Google Adsense

Andalucia Highlights 2021

Welcome to the Andalucia Highlights 2021!

Andalucia.com is dedicated to southern Spain, where visitors and locals enjoy lots of sunshine each year, life is lived outdoors, and fiestas are celebrated merrily with local food and wine, all the year round, in every village, town and city, to celebrate everything from food harvests to religious pilgrimages. Andalucia is one of the most varied regions in Spain, with every type of scenery from wetlands to deserts, mountains to beaches.

Naturally 2020 and 2021 are different, we look forward to returning to normality and the return of international tourists in 2022.

Most of the 10.000 pages on Andalucia.com are read by searching for information on a specific subject or by navigating from the main menu above.

The Andalucia.com highlights are an opportunity to read the website like you would a magazine, simply scroll down this page and click on an article that interests you. We are adding several new articles at the top of the list each week. The page features a mix of articles timed to coincide with an event or news story and timeless classics.

When you reach the bottom of the page, which is the beginning of this year, explore another year.

Welcome to the Andalucia.com highlights.

Every spring Córdoba bursts into bloom with special festivities for the month of May. Starting off with a parade known as the “Battle of the Flowers”, the city officially launches into its spring celebrations with the May Crosses festival usually taking place during the first week of the month, followed by the Patio Contests that can easily continue well past the middle of the month.


Just outside Malaga, "La Concepción Jardín Botánico-Historico de Málaga." is a magnificent botanical garden. There are regular guided tours of the gardens which pass through exotic trees and plants, Roman sculptures and a waterfall. There is also a beautiful mansion that once belonged to the creators of the gardens, the Marquis of Casa Loring and his wife, and several panoramic view points to enjoy.




The city's name started out as "Xeres" in Roman times (though the Phoenicians were here before them), then became "Sherrish" under its Moorish rulers (giving its name to the fortified wine, finally ending up as "Jerez de la Frontera" in the late 14th century, due to its location on the border of the Muslim and Christian-ruled regions. In Catalan, Italian and French, sherry is still called "Xeres", harking back to the Roman/medieval Castillian word, "Xerez".


The Solheim Cup, the most important on the international women's calendar, takes place every two years and in 2023 it will be held from 18 to 24 September on the courses at Finca Cortesín in Casares. The Sondheim cup is the womens equivalent of the mens Ryder Cup where USA and EU teams compete.


This highly acclaimed actor has it all – the looks, the charm, the drive, the energy, and the creativity. Star of innumerable Hollywood movies, Banderas is one of Andalucia’s most famous, and proudest, exports.



Malaga´s astonishing reinvention of itself, from stopping-off point for beachgoers to artistic mecca of southern Spain, has been triggered by the Picasso museum and followed up by the  Centro de Arte Contemporaneo (CAC) de Malaga, Malaga´s Tate Modern. This has temporary exhibitions by cutting-edge international artists, such as Louise Bourgeois and Robert Mapplethorpe, as well as showing both up-and-coming and established Spanish artists (Chema Cobo), and a permanent collection.



La Alcazaba is Malaga's most important landmark, and overlooks the city from a hilltop inland. It is one of two Moorish fortresses in the city, the other being the Castillo de Gibralfaro, situated above. The Alcazaba is the best-preserved Moorish fortress palace in Spain. It received about 1 million visitors in 2016.


Visitors to Seville will notice a symbol on many signs around the city, from taxis and buses to sewer covers, consisting of the letters ´NO8DO´. This is the city´s logo, and legend says that it originates from the 13th-century coat of arms awarded to Sevilla by King Alfonso X the Wise.

One of the most controversial of Seville´s many claims is that Cristobal Colón (Christopher Columbus) is buried here, in Sevilla´s mighty Gothic cathedral, variously described as either the third, second or biggest cathedral in the world (the other contenders being St Peter´s in Rome, and St Paul´s in London), depending on who you talk to.


La Alcazaba is Malaga's most important landmark, and overlooks the city from a hilltop inland. It is one of two Moorish fortresses in the city, the other being the Castillo de Gibralfaro, situated above. The Alcazaba is the best-preserved Moorish fortress palace in Spain. It received about 1 million visitors in 2016.




 

Andalucia Highlights