Cádiz

Cádiz

Below is a selection of excursions from Cadiz city to locations outside the city of Cadiz. If you are interested in local guided tours of the city of Cadiz itself they are found on our Cadiz tour page.

Here is a list of city tours that you can do in Cadiz.. If you are interested in a day trip or an excursions from Cadiz city to Seville or Jerez or villages in the countryside If you are interested they are found on our Cadiz excursions page.

Cadiz is a small city, interestingly located on a peninsula meaning it is surrounded by beautiful beaches and sea. Cadiz offers many of the thrills found in a city from modern bars and restaurants to suave bars and historic monuments but is also set in an idilic coastal surrounding.

Carnival is the biggest event in Cadiz's calendar, and the most important of its type on mainland Spain, just as the Feria is for Seville. People flood in from all over Spain, and beyond, to enjoy the noisy, colourful, festive atmosphere, singing competitions, concerts (rock, flamenco, samba), comedy, children's shows, parades, firework displays and street parties. Carnaval is also celebrated in towns and cities around Andalucia.

As one of Spain's major ports during the 16th century, Cadiz copied the carnival of Venice, a city with which it had much trade, and since then it has become the liveliest and most dazzling carnival town in mainland Spain, famous for its amusing and creative characters and satirical song groups.

The Granada Carnival, along with those of the provincial towns, are among the least publicised, but they do take place. The festival usually lasts about a week in the provincial capital and starts well after Shrove Tuesday. It includes the usual singing contests that are held in theatres and other venues. There is also plenty of activity in the streets of Granada (a city that is famous for its "tapa" appetisers that accompany drinks at no extra charge), including a parade.

From 1937 to 1977, the people of Málaga kept their costumes packed away and refrained from meeting to practice and enjoy the old carnival tunes together - much less organise any traditional parades or other celebrations. This was due to the prohibition issued by Franco and strictly enforced in this area.

The 17th-century Castillo de Santa Catalina, which formed part of the city’s defences from the time of King Felipe II, has been partially restored and now has four rooms where exhibitions of paintings, engravings and photographs are held.

Cadiz is often cited as the oldest city in Spain and one of the oldest in Europe. A typical Andalucian city with a wealth of attractive views and well-preserved monuments, Cadiz is unique in that it is located on a narrow stretch of land surrounded by the sea.