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Costa Almeria

Costa Almeria

Coastal property for sale on the Costa Almeria, Andalucia. The Costa Almeria, which runs from the fishing town of Adra in the west through the popular resort of Almerimar and Roquetas de Mar and the charming towns of Mojacar and Vera in the East. This stretch of coastline takes its name from the province.

Still harbouring largely undiscovered coastline, the Costa Almeria offers a staggering 320 days of sun a year and some superb beaches and hotels to enjoy it. Lively resorts in the eastern part offer plenty of accommodation options: yachting centre Almerimar, Roquetas de Mar and Aguadulce, with its long, inviting beach. For hotels in a quieter, more undeveloped area, head for the Cabo de Gata, a wild.

Hostals and hostels are a fantastic way to travel Andalucia on a budget. Despite their affordable prices, this doesn't mean to say that you have to compromise on quality, with many well known for their individual character and centralised location.

This Costa is made up of the coastline of Almería province. The coastline is home to thousands of plastic greenhouses however there are also beautiful wildlife reserves lining the coast and of course, kilometers of beaches to attract sun seekers.

The hilltop Alcazaba's hefty walls and towers dominate the city and command magnificent views over the old town below and across to the Mediterranean. Measuring 25,000m2, this was the largest fortress built by the Moors. The Alcazaba was founded during the first half of the 10th century by Cordoban Caliph Abd al-Rahman III, who also built Medina Azahara.

Archaeological excavations in recent years have verified the Roman Empire’s presence both inside and outside of the Alcazaba’s walls, and yet its current silhouette can be traced back to its founder, Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Rahman III (who also built Medina Azahara). According to an inscription found on marble which is now housed in the (Archeological) Museum of Almería, he ordered it to be built in the latter half of the 10th century.

The interior of the Alcazaba is divided into three walled recintos, or compounds, spreading up the long slope from the lowest part near the entrance; the first two are Islamic, and the third is Christian. A long fortified wall, the Muralla de Jayran (or Jairan), named after the 11th century king who built them, stretches from the Alcazaba, down the hill and up the other side to the Cerro de San Cristobal. From here the panoramic views take in the Alcazaba itself, as well as the city and port stretched out below.

Las Negras takes its name from the mountain to the the left of the village, El Cerro Negro (“The Black Mountain”). This is a large mass of dark volcanic material, which has spread over the sea and beaches of the town as an effect of erosion, now filling the stony shoreline with its colour. The village has around 350 inhabitants.

This is the name of a small hamlet near on one of the major Capes of the Spanish Mediterranean coast. Although there are only a few houses, a small general store and a few beach bars here, its a good place to stock up on refreshments. The cape features a rocky coastline with a few inlets and very little sign of himan development. It gives it name to the Natural Park Cabo de Gata - Nijar.

Retamar is one of the coastal suburban towns of the city of Almería. With easy access to the airport and ample holiday apartments, it provides visitors from Spain and further afield with an ideal base from which to explore the Almerian cost. The town has around 7,000 inhabitants. The neighbourhood of Retamar has existed for just over 30 years.

Agua Amarga is a pretty fishing village and beach resort on the Almeria coast, in Cabo de Gata-Nijar natural park, with a population of just 400. Still undiscovered by large-scale tourism, this is one of Andalucia's hidden seaside treasures. While its name may translate as Bitter Water, this delightful, laid-back beach town has excellent Mediterranean cuisine, good independent boutiques and trendy bars.

Rodalquilar is a small village of about 200 inhabitants just off the Cabo de Gata coast road, AL-4200 between San José and Las Negras. It is a few kilometres inland, and it is not historic hill village but rather a mid-twentieth century mining village. It looks uninteresting from the road and is generally passed by tourists and travellers. This is a mistake. A memorial in the village poetically describes Rodalquilar.

If Bond movies, quirky bars, fossils and remote Mediterranean beaches appeal to you, take a trip to Los Escullos. Los Escullos is a small cluster of houses overlooking the jagged Almeria coastline, a few km north of San Jose. Sitting under the extinct volcano Cerro del Fraile (at 493m, El Fraile peak is the highest of the Sierra del Cabo de Gata), it has a certain charm.

Isleta del Moro is a quaint fishing hamlet known for its picturesque setting, and well worth the500m detour from the AL-4200 San Jose to Las Negras coast road.Population is about 200. The name comes from Isleta del Moro Arraez, possibly from a Moorish commander called Mohamed Arraez (ar-rais means boat owner). Straddling a narrow peninsula, between two small hills, the hamlet offers a very photogenic coastal scene.

Almeria has an abundance of restaurants, tapas bars and cafés offering delicious food and snacks at reasonable prices. Like many places in Andalucia, a lot of tapas bars in Almería serve a small tapas dish with every round of drinks or drink ordered. Restaurant quality in the city can vary.

Almerimar is a purpose-built modern resort town situated 40km west of Almeria city. It serves as a spectacular family holiday resort, boasting 13km of beautiful, sandy beaches with crystal blue waters. The town has no shortage of services and ammenities, including restaurants, shopping centres, bars and hotels, to meet the needs of the waves of tourists that flood the area during the summer period.