Tarifa

Tarifa

The Duna de Bolonia, covering around 131m², is protected for its geological interest. It is located at the village of Bolonia, on the headland of Punta Camarinal, exposed to the ferocious easterly levante winds. At its highest point, the dune measures around 30m.

Just west of Tarifa is this magnificent 3km-long beach, the Playa de los Lances, 226ha of which is protected. The fine white sands are backed by a low ridge of dunes and the marshlands of the Jara and Vega rivers. These rivers run parallel to the beach and have created two lagoons, the Jeli and Montellano.

A wonderful opportunity to get close to whales, dolphins and other sea mammals, in their natural habitat in the Straits of Gibraltar. This is the area of sea where where the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea meet, in the narrow space between the southermost point of Spain, and the African continent.

Created in 2003, the Parque Natural del Estrecho is the southernmost protected area in Europe. It is made up of a long stretch of coastline covering 18,931ha from Cabo de Gracia in the west near Bolonia and Punta del Carnero in the east, south of Algeciras.

This vast park covers 167,767ha from Tarifa in the south to the Sierra de Grazalema Natural Park in the north. It is named after its handsome and beautifully kept cork tree grove, the largest in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the most important ones in the world.

Some companies offer luxury yacht and boat hire, a luxury sailing concierge, who can arrange almost everything from sunset cruises with fine dining to trips to Morocco and Portugal. All in all it's great to see Andalucia from the sea.

Tarifa isn’t only a Mecca for fanatical wind and kite surfers. There are so many other aspects that make Tarifa the beautiful place it is; whale watching on the straits, horse riding, land sailing, mojitos in the chillout beach bars like the famous Tumbao with their unforgettable sunsets, and finally the nightlife scene which has its own unique vibe.

Tarifa´s shopping scene is as varied as the crowd who frequent the town. Classics like the indoor fish market and touristic souvenir shops are balanced with the wave of boutiques that have begun to colonise the old town to cater for the hip surfing set. The result occasionally feels like a clash, but captures the spirit of old and new which so characterizes Tarifa.

Tarifa sits at the southern-most point of mainland Europe, where the Med meets the Atlantic. Just 14km across the Straits of Gibraltar at its narrowest point, the town enjoys spectacular views of the Rif mountains of North Africa, just across the water.

Famous for being the European capital of kite-surfing and located at the southernmost tip of Spain, Tarifa has a laid-back atmosphere all of its own. With its reliable breezes, kilometres of sandy beaches and a Moorish fort, it is a relatively small town which offers fantastic watersports all year round, fascinating history, and excellent nightlife.