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The Plaza de Toros de la Merced (bullring) was built from 1901-1902 and commissioned by architect, Trinidad Gallego Díaz, who was inspired by the bullring in Madrid, known as "the one on Calle Aragon".

Muelle de Rio Tinto is a commercial dock used for the trade of material from the mines of the Rio Tinto Company Limited on the Rio Odiel. It is commonly known as the "Muelle del Tinto" but is no longer in use. It is however, a popular place for many to visit, and enjoy a walk down the 'muelle' itself or even to fish. It was declared of Cultural Interest in 2003.

Muelle de las Carabelas (Warf of the Caravels) is a waterfront exhibition with life-size replicas of Columbus's three ships: the Niña, the Pinta and the Santa María, built for the 500th anniversary celebrations. The construction of Muelle de las Carabelas was carried out by architect, Pluvio Fernández Heredia, and inaugurated on 15 March 1994.

Madinat al-Zahra was declared a UNESCO world heratige site on 1st July 2018. We are in the year 400 of the Hegira, 1010 AD of our era. On the southern slopes of Jebel al-Arus, the Bride's Mountain, the marble, jasper and precious metals of the city of Madinat al-Zahra gleam in the morning sun among silver-leafed olive groves.

We've put together a top ten list - if you're short of time in Granada and you can't decide where to go and what to see in this historic city, just follow our tips. Explore the city's rich cultural, religious and architectural past and enjoy some extra musical, literary and scientific delights.

This traditional food market, with stalls run by local tradesmen, is located in the centre of the city, in Calle Doña Blanca. Housed in a beautiful, high-ceilinged, period building, it has a lively, buzzing atmosphere, and offers an excellent selection of fresh fish, meat, and fruit and vegetables.

A symbol of British power in late 19th-century Huelva, the Casa Colón is the grandest of all the buildings constructed by the city's bourgeoisie around the same time. It is an imposing presence at the beginning of the Alameda Sundheim, with a terracotta façade and ornate wrought-iron balconies.

The Barrio de Reina Victoria, otherwise known as the "Barrio Obrero" (Workers' District), is a testament to its name: an example of a Victorian English suburb superimposed onto an Andalucian landscape. Situated at the eastern end of Alameda Sundheim.