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Almería

Almería

Reviews of the prestigious hotels of Almeria. Almeria is one of the least-known provincial capitals in Andalucia. But lately this ancient port city has been experiencing a renaissance, thanks to an urban regeneration programme which started in 2007 and is scheduled to finish in 2013.

Places to go and things to see in the city of Almeria.This includes the Alcazaba, Cathedral and many museums and art galleries.

Filled with important and fascinating historical attractions, Almeria is the capital of Andalucia's most easterly province of the same name. The Alcazaba of Almería, a huge attraction, is the second largest among the Muslim fortresses of Andalusia, after the Alhambra of Granada. Rentals are usually located near the winding streets that just beg to be explored. Below are a few rentals we could suggest.

The hilltop Alcazaba's hefty walls and towers dominate the city and command magnificent views over the old town below and across to the Mediterranean. Measuring 25,000m2, this was the largest fortress built by the Moors. The Alcazaba was founded during the first half of the 10th century by Cordoban Caliph Abd al-Rahman III, who also built Medina Azahara.

Almeria is one of the least-known provincial capitals in Andalucia. But lately this ancient port city has been experiencing a renaissance, thanks to an urban regeneration programme which started in 2007 and is scheduled to finish in 2013.

During the Muslin era, Almeria did not have a water supply network for buildings, making it necessary to build bathing areas and washing fountains. We have news of the water supply to Almeria mainly thanks to al-Himyari and al-Udri. According to al-Himyari, Jairán during his reign (1012-1028) was the one who ordered the construction of the water pipeline, and according to al-Udri, it was during the reign of his successor Zuhayr (1028-1038). In any case, they are traditionally known as Aljibes de Jairán.

Archaeological excavations in recent years have verified the Roman Empire’s presence both inside and outside of the Alcazaba’s walls, and yet its current silhouette can be traced back to its founder, Umayyad Caliph Abd al-Rahman III (who also built Medina Azahara). According to an inscription found on marble which is now housed in the (Archeological) Museum of Almería, he ordered it to be built in the latter half of the 10th century.

The interior of the Alcazaba is divided into three walled recintos, or compounds, spreading up the long slope from the lowest part near the entrance; the first two are Islamic, and the third is Christian. A long fortified wall, the Muralla de Jayran (or Jairan), named after the 11th century king who built them, stretches from the Alcazaba, down the hill and up the other side to the Cerro de San Cristobal. From here the panoramic views take in the Alcazaba itself, as well as the city and port stretched out below.

In a few decades, Almeria’s gastronomy has undergone a spectacular transformation. From rather scarce products from the land and sea, it has passed to intensive agricultural production and, finally, to products of extraordinary quality that are exported all over the world.