Huelva

Huelva

Huelva and its environs is a Mecca for those interested in Christopher Columbus, with a number of significant tourist attractions relating to the famous explorer. Cristóbal Colón (as he is known in Spain), is thought by most to have been born in Genoa, Italy around 1451.

Huelva may lack the region's star attractions of other provincial capitals, but once you get past the industrial sprawl on its outskirts, the centre is a pleasant place with many pretty plazas, absorbing historical monuments and, as you'd expect from a city with a bustling port, a wealth of seafood bars and restaurants.

Museums in Huelva City: Museo de Huelva, Casa-Museo Zenobia-Juan Ramón, Museo Diocesano de Arte Sacro, Monasterio de la Rábida.

The Plaza de Toros de la Merced (bullring) was built from 1901-1902 and commissioned by architect, Trinidad Gallego Díaz, who was inspired by the bullring in Madrid, known as "the one on Calle Aragon".

Muelle de las Carabelas (Warf of the Caravels) is a waterfront exhibition with life-size replicas of Columbus's three ships: the Niña, the Pinta and the Santa María, built for the 500th anniversary celebrations. The construction of Muelle de las Carabelas was carried out by architect, Pluvio Fernández Heredia, and inaugurated on 15 March 1994.

Huelva is not a large provincial capital however it is certainly well known and for good reason. It is from here that Christopher Columbus set sail for America in 1492 and there are number of important attractions relating to his journey in and around the city.

A symbol of British power in late 19th-century Huelva, the Casa Colón is the grandest of all the buildings constructed by the city's bourgeoisie around the same time. It is an imposing presence at the beginning of the Alameda Sundheim, with a terracotta façade and ornate wrought-iron balconies.

The Barrio de Reina Victoria, otherwise known as the "Barrio Obrero" (Workers' District), is a testament to its name: an example of a Victorian English suburb superimposed onto an Andalucian landscape. Situated at the eastern end of Alameda Sundheim.

Not the most beautiful of Andalucia’s provincial capitals, having lost many of its historic buildings in the devastating Lisbon earthquake of 1755, Huelva nevertheless has its own charm. Since Phoenician times it has been an important port, serving akey role for exporting minerals from the Rio Tinto mines.

This massive statue, located at Punta Sebo where the rivers Odiel and Tinto meet, is often mistaken for the figure of Columbus. The statue actually represents a Franciscan friar of Monasterio La Rábida, who took Christopher Columbus in while he was planning his first voyage and waiting for confirmation of funding from the Spanish monarchs.