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Huelva

Huelva

Muelle de las Carabelas (Warf of the Caravels) is a waterfront exhibition with life-size replicas of Columbus's three ships: the Niña, the Pinta and the Santa María, built for the 500th anniversary celebrations. The construction of Muelle de las Carabelas was carried out by architect, Pluvio Fernández Heredia, and inaugurated on 15 March 1994.

Huelva and its environs is a Mecca for those interested in Christopher Columbus, with a number of significant tourist attractions relating to the famous explorer. Cristóbal Colón (as he is known in Spain), is thought by most to have been born in Genoa, Italy around 1451.

The British engineers and miners who worked in the 19th and 20th centuries wanted to make themselves a home-from-home. So they built English-style houses complete with front gardens, right in the middle of Huelva. The Victorian Barrio Obrero, also known as the Barrio Reina Victoria, which dates from 1916, is a microcosm of suburban England in Andalucia. Based on the concept of a garden city, it has avenues of mock-Tudor semis, with lawns, hedges and rose gardens.

Huelva is a port city which holds an important place in the history of Andalucia, as the area from where Columbus sailed to American in 1492. In the 19th and early 20th century, it was an important mining centre, and some colonial buildings and quays from that era remain, including the Muelle de Riotinto.

Huelva may lack the region's star attractions of other provincial capitals, but once you get past the industrial sprawl on its outskirts, the centre is a pleasant place with many pretty plazas, absorbing historical monuments and, as you'd expect from a city with a bustling port, a wealth of seafood bars and restaurants.

Reviews of the prestigious hotels of Huelva. Huelva is a port city which holds an important place in the history of Andalucia, as the area from where Columbus sailed to American in 1492. In the 19th and early 20th century, it was an important mining centre, and some colonial buildings and quays from that era remain, including the Muelle de Riotinto.

The train station is called Huelva and it opened on the 23th April 2018. It is located in the south of the city and the main access is from the south on Avenida de Cadiz and also and access from Avenida Escultura Miss Whitney. It is a simple single storey building of 1,200 m2, and includes main hall, commercial units and other areas of public use.

Museums in Huelva City: Museo de Huelva, Casa-Museo Zenobia-Juan Ramón, Museo Diocesano de Arte Sacro, Monasterio de la Rábida.

The Plaza de Toros de la Merced (bullring) was built from 1901-1902 and commissioned by architect, Trinidad Gallego Díaz, who was inspired by the bullring in Madrid, known as "the one on Calle Aragon".

The Gran Teatro (Great Theatre) was built by Pedro Sánchez y Núñez in 1923.It is a stately building of classic style, typical to the late nineteenth century with Second Empire decoration.

The Conservatorio  Profesional de Música de Huelva "Javier Perianes" is a music centre dedicated to teaching as well as holding musical performances. It was inaugurated by the class of 1986/1987 with a very small faculty of teachers as well as a small number of students not exceeding 86.

Muelle de Rio Tinto is a commercial dock used for the trade of material from the mines of the Rio Tinto Company Limited on the Rio Odiel. It is commonly known as the "Muelle del Tinto" but is no longer in use. It is however, a popular place for many to visit, and enjoy a walk down the 'muelle' itself or even to fish. It was declared of Cultural Interest in 2003.

Huelva is not a large provincial capital however it is certainly well known and for good reason. It is from here that Christopher Columbus set sail for America in 1492 and there are number of important attractions relating to his journey in and around the city.

Huelva, being a port town, is most famous for the exquisite seafood that can be found here. Shellfish is a popular choice in the area and it is very easy to find restaurants serving the freshest of fish here. There are also many tapas bars in the city that serve up delicious dishes.

A symbol of British power in late 19th-century Huelva, the Casa Colón is the grandest of all the buildings constructed by the city's bourgeoisie around the same time. It is an imposing presence at the beginning of the Alameda Sundheim, with a terracotta façade and ornate wrought-iron balconies.

The Barrio de Reina Victoria, otherwise known as the "Barrio Obrero" (Workers' District), is a testament to its name: an example of a Victorian English suburb superimposed onto an Andalucian landscape. Situated at the eastern end of Alameda Sundheim.

Not the most beautiful of Andalucia’s provincial capitals, having lost many of its historic buildings in the devastating Lisbon earthquake of 1755, Huelva nevertheless has its own charm. Since Phoenician times it has been an important port, serving akey role for exporting minerals from the Rio Tinto mines.

This massive statue, located at Punta Sebo where the rivers Odiel and Tinto meet, is often mistaken for the figure of Columbus. The statue actually represents a Franciscan friar of Monasterio La Rábida, who took Christopher Columbus in while he was planning his first voyage and waiting for confirmation of funding from the Spanish monarchs.

The Huelva carnival is one of the biggest in Andalucia and is known as the Columbian Carnival, in honour of Christopher Columbus, who sailed from Huelva to discover the New World. The Huelva carnival closed down during Franco's prohibition and it took a few years to start it up again, even after democracy overtook the country. It was not, therefore, until 1983 that this carnival re-started after a long sleep.

Located in the northern section of the Paraje Natural Marismas del Odiel, this 597-hectare nature reserve is made up of marshland and creeks.