Car Hire

Enjoy a collection of Andalucia Road Trip Videos that have been sent to us. Starting in the delightfully vibrant Malaga, my gorgeous accomplice and I spent 2 weeks travelling around as much of Andalucia as we could squeeze in. Starting in Malaga we travelled to the breathtakingly romantic Ronda where we were blown away by its beauty and history.

All the town of Andalucia are linked by national ( N-340) (Red Signage) or Andalucia ( A-346) (Green sinage) roads. There are still some smaller provincial roads (MA-2547) (Yellow signage) and even smaller comarcal roads (C-4568)(Green Signage).

Lookout for specific speed limits. These will be signed but if you are driving across country you may forget the specific limit applies. Tunnels and underpass even on motorways will be limited to 80 or 100 km/h. Sharp bends will be signed, cross country roads passing through villages will be 50km/hr or road intersections 80km/hr.

The main motorways in Spain are generally well signed. However, if you are unfamiliar with Spanish geography, you’d best travel with a good road map. This is because signs will indicate the next large town or city but may not direct you to major cities until you are relatively close.

GPS works well throughout Andalucia, but there is no substitute for a good road map when it comes to planning out a journey or ensuring you can find alternative routes when construction blocks off the access seen on a GPS screen. A wide variety of road maps flood the market. However, the most highly recommended is the Michellin 446 of Southern Spain.

Almost all garages sell petrol at the maximum price permitted by the government. This can vary. As a general rule, most stations are self service. The exception is in some rural areas. Credit cards are universally accepted and tipping is not expected – regardless of what you might read in a guide book.

Spanish number plates are the new style number plates featuring the blue european logo on the left with E for Spain. The format for these is national and comprises four numbers followed by three letters. They are sequential on a national basis.